Session Information

Wednesday, June 11th

SUNYLA Continuing Education Workshops

8:30 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. (with a 10:00-10:30 a.m. break) Session 1/2

  • Student Group Work: Collaboration or Catastrophe?
    • Michelle Toth, SUNY Plattsburgh
    • This session will cover: The purpose and benefits of group work (or, the answer to – ‘why are you making us do this?’); The pros and cons of group work for instructors, students and the learning process; Types and formats of groups (for credit courses, one-shots or online); The methods and madness in assigning groups; How to facilitate a good group experience (we are more to blame than you think); Using technology to facilitate groups; and assessing the product, process and participants.

8:30 a.m. – 10:00 a.m. – Session 1

  • Geeks Bearing Gifts: Unwrapping New Technology Trends
    • Missy Harvey, National Network of Libraries of Medicine, Middle Atlantic Region
    • This session is intended to provide a fun, fast-paced, and informative introduction to and update on, today’s hottest technology trends. Program participants will be able to identify technology trends and they will understand how these trends will impact or can be integrated into traditional library services: http://nnlm.gov/training/geekgifts/.
  • The “Secret Life” of Online Students: See What Goes on in an Online Information Literacy Class and See – via Blackboard Surveys – What Students Have to Say About Taking Online Library Courses
    • Jane Verostek, SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry
    • Are you wondering what online information literacy courses look like and what students really think of taking online library courses? In this session you will learn how to teach information literacy completely online using Blackboard. SUNY ESF has been using Blackboard since 2009 to teach a 5 week 1 credit information literacy course. Our online course is taught to students during the regular semesters/on campus and during the summer to remote/distance students. This presentation will show real world examples from the class and will give steps on how to set up and organize the course within Blackboard. Ideas on how to get the students excited and involved in class blogs will also be given. Helpful online links and tips for different research tools will be also given with regards to teaching about library catalogs, serial literature databases, the Internet, and creating bibliographies. Time will be spent in a live online information literacy class. We will also look at survey responses from students who went through online information literacy classes.
  • Creating e-Citizens: the New York State Digital Literacy Curriculum (Part 1)
    • MaryAnne Waltz, New York Library Association
    • An introduction to the approved curriculum for statewide use in Digital Literacy training for adults. A complete product, it comprises four modules: introduction to computers; introduction to the Internet; communicating on the Internet; and word processing. Each module includes a lesson plan with goals (outcomes), supplementary instructional resources, and assessment tools. We will discuss the program, its goals and implementation, the curriculum, and its ramifications for libraries.
  • WGIL Special Interest Group
    • Carleen Huxley, SUNY Jefferson
    • Participants will learn:
    1. What the SUNYLA WGIL General Education task force has done.
    2. The current status of initiatives by the task force.
    3. What they can do to help bring this dialogue back to their home campus.
  • Librarian Equity: An Open Forum Q&A on UUP Contract Appendix 48
    • Jason Torre, Stony Brook University Libraries & UUP Appendix 48 Advisory Committee on Librarian [Equity] Issues
    • Librarian Equity: An Open Forum Q&A on UUP Contract Appendix 48 is an open forum, question and answer session designed to provide SUNYLA members represented by United University Professions with information on the 2011-2016 NYS/UUP Contract Appendix 48: Executive Level Review of Librarian Issues and to provide input for the post-contract negotiations on Librarian equity issues.

 

10:00 a.m.  12:00 p.m. SUNYLA Council Meeting (Cobb – UL)

 

10:30 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. – Session 2

  • Search Engine Optimization
    • Roger Lipera, University at Albany
    • This class covers the basics of optimizing a Web site to improve its placement in search engine results. Learn the principles behind proper Meta tags, text, alt tags, and much more. Participants will also discover how to drive visitors to Web sites using good promotional practices. Included will be information about Facebook and Open Graph attributes. You do not need to have a Web site or know HTML to participate. This class is intended for those who want to become familiar with the concepts and techniques of SEO and site promotion.
  • Altmetrics in Practice
    • Mike Buschman, Plum Analytics
    • There is almost no limit to the ways research is being discovered and disseminated. For example, today we have things like Twitter and Mendeley. In the future there will be more new ways of interacting with research. Yet, even though this area has moved quickly, we are still often using techniques developed fifty years ago to evaluate research. Journal Impact Factor and citation counts are the tried and true measure for research impact. They are still important, but now we need modern ways of capturing activity around research. One field that has been born into this area is altmetrics. During this panel, the speakers will define altmetrics and talk about what is good and bad about them, discuss social media and what it can and cannot tell you about research, and how using new metrics helps support the research community. The panel will consist of both a provider of one of the altmetric systems and a librarian user of such a system.
  • Creating e-Citizens: the New York State Digital Literacy Curriculum (Part 2)
    • Mary Anne Waltz, New York Library Association
    • An introduction to the approved curriculum for statewide use in Digital Literacy training for adults. A complete product, it comprises four modules: introduction to computers; introduction to the Internet; communicating on the Internet; and word processing. Each module includes a lesson plan with goals (outcomes), supplementary instructional resources, and assessment tools. We will discuss the program, its goals and implementation, the curriculum, and its ramifications for libraries.
  • Artemis Literary Sources: Promotion, Discovery, and Connecting the Dots Across the Curriculum
    • Nan Frost and Stacey Knibloe, Gale Cengage
    • A composition or literature writing assignment doesn’t mean you have to keep your discussion limited to genre, voice, or mood.  Literature is not written in a disciplinary vacuum.  This round table discussion looks at using seemingly “literature specific” resources to connect the dots to multidisciplinary research and writing. Participants will discuss best practices to promote Artemis Literary Sources to students and faculty across the curriculum.   Inspiration begins with the hunt!
  • The Next Generation Web of Science & Journal Citation Report
    • Stephen DiGiulio, Thomson Reuters Expert in the U.S. Academic Markets
    • Come learn about the next generation Web of Science; a new, user-friendly interface, expanded content and convenient open-web links. The next generation Web of Science makes Web of Science content and records easily accessible to users via links from open-web platforms, such as Google Scholar. Open Access (OA) and Funding Acknowledgement functionality, as well as the new Journal Citation Reports & Essential Science Indicators on the InCites platform will also be discussed.

 

1:00 p.m. – 2:30 p.m. – Session 3

  • Customizing EBSCO’s A to Z and LinkSource Products
    • Patrick Patterson, SUNY Potsdam
    • In this workshop you will learn how to customize EBSCO’s A to Z and LinkSource products to best fit the needs of your library. A to Z is used to manage all of your library’s electronic resources including subscriptions to individual electronic journals and full-text databases. LinkSource is the link resolver component that allows for full text linking to occur from one database to another. This will be a chance to learn about the different ways that you can present information to your patrons, such as branding and creating section titles to communicate the type of content that is available to them. The workshop is for administrators who are responsible for managing these two products.
  • Sustainable Thinking
    • Rebekkah Smith Aldrich, Mid-Hudson Library System, and Mary Ellen Mallia, PhD
    • Join the “sustainable thinking” movement! The infusion of the core value of sustainability into our organizations – in every area of operations, not just facilities – will help lead to choices, partnerships and messages that will positively impact the future of our libraries. There are advantages to be gained on many fronts by adopting and developing a sustainable thought pattern, including funding, public perception, and library worker satisfaction.
  • Understanding Altmetrics
    • William Gunn, Mendeley
    • This workshop will provide an introduction to the concept of altmetrics and how they’re being used by libraries, researchers, and publishers. The major sources of altmetrics will be compared and the coverage, time scales, and field differences will be discussed. Attendees will learn how talk to authors about altmetrics and assist patrons in understanding the broader impacts of their research by building their altmetrics profile and registering for an ORCID. In addition, examples of the use of altmetrics for discovery and collection development will be demonstrated. We would like this workshop to be interactive, so there will be plenty of opportunities for hands-on activities and questions. The primary presenter will seek to partner with a librarian attendee to develop the workshop and ensure relevance to attendees.
  • Getting Started with WordPress for the Classroom and Personal Use
    • Roger Lipera, University at Albany
    • WordPress is a very popular Web content management and page design system. This class is an overview of how WordPress works. Discussion includes how to start a WordPress account, setup a site, and the differences between WordPress.com and WordPress.org.
  • Collaborating to Write Scholarly Communications: Find Inspiration from one Librarian’s Journey
    • Jennifer Kegler, the College at Brockport
    • During this session perspective authors will learn how one librarian wrote and published articles, as a sole author, co-author and with a group of authors. Creative opportunities and projects abound on a college campus; the harder part is converting these projects into publishable material. Bring your own ideas and/or drafts, and we will work on them together. We will also identify publishing opportunities: both “traditional” journals and open access titles.
  • A whirlwind tour of RDA, or, Toto, I don’t think we’re in AACR2 anymore!
    • John Myers, Union College
    • An overview of the key conceptual and structural differences between AACR2 and RDA, accompanied by examples of specific differences between the results achieved by the two cataloging codes.

 

Thursday, June 12th

8:30 a.m. – 9:15 a.m. – Session 1

  • Pushing Out the Boundaries and Establishing New Frontiers: An Active Information Literacy Program at Work
    • Charles Keyes, Hong Cheng, Galina Letnikova, and Alexandra Rojas, all of LaGuardia Community College
    • Quite often an academic library’s role within the curriculum is proscribed by an institution’s limited understanding of what a library can really contribute. At LaGuardia Community College, library faculty have successfully worked to build the Library’s reputation as a department that is key in helping to develop and teach research and critical inquiry skills. The presenters will outline how they established a strong, key presence in the new first year experience program, the teaching of credit courses, the Honors Program, and co-curricular activities. Advice and suggestions on pushing out a library’s boundaries and establishing new frontiers will be given.
  • Information Literacy Portal: Status and Next Steps
    • Logan Rath, The College at Brockport
    • At the OpenSUNY summit on December 5th librarians overwhelmingly decided that development of guidelines for and portal to share information literacy practices and content was a priority. This presentation will cover where we are and what our next steps will be. Want to be involved? This collaborative discussion is definitely for you!
  • From Silos to the Semantic Web: as Library Catalogs Open, What Do Students Hope to Find?
    • Madeline Veitch and Megan Coder, both representing SUNY New Paltz
    • With the arrival of discovery services and RDA cataloging rules, there is growing interest in making library catalog data more accessible to searchers on the open web. In a linked data or semantic web environment, bibliographic record content would coexist or integrate with commercial content. In a study of user preferences among undergraduate students at SUNY New Paltz, we asked students to reflect on which elements of a book or film record they value the most highly, and to rank existing commercial databases such as Amazon, IMDb, and LibraryThing against corresponding records in the SUNY New Paltz Ebsco Discovery Service. Trust and perceptions of credibility may play an important role in how students regard library catalog and commercial data, another topic explored in this research study.
  • Trash or Treasure? Gifts-in-Kind Practices Among New York State Libraries
    • Joseph A. Williams, SUNY Maritime College
    • Gifts-in-kind are often the bane of acquisition and collection development librarians. Unloved and unsolicited, they nevertheless form an important part of our print collections. The presenter, unduly fascinated by gifts-in-kind, conducted a survey of all public and academic New York State libraries to measure and analyze gifts-in-kind practices. The results are enlightening, not only as to the perceived role of gifts-in-kind by librarians, but also how the results underscore the fundamental differences between academic libraries and their public brethren.
  • Citations: There’s an App for That!
    • Mary Van Ullen and Jane Kessler, both of University at Albany
    • A common problem students struggle with is using correct citation format to create accurate bibliographies for their assignments. Bibliographic citation management software and web-based citation generators have existed for years. In addition, many popular academic databases also have online citation help features. With the increasing popularity of mobile devices, developers have created a variety of citation apps. These apps enable a patron to interact directly with library materials to create citations using their smartphones and tablets. In this presentation, we will share the results of our research on the ease of use and accuracy of some of the apps for both Android and IOS devices.
  • Website Usability without Bogging Down
    • Emily Mitchell, SUNY Oswego
    • Wouldn’t it be great if libraries could collaborate with our users to make our websites better? But getting user input takes exorbitant amounts of time, effort, money, or mad skills–doesn’t it? Come hear how one librarian is working with library stakeholders plus users and their data to find quick, high-quality solutions to her library website’s problems. We’ll touch on website analytics, task analysis, first-click testing, and what to do about that important page that no one is using.
  • Improving ILL Efficiencies with IDS Logic
    • Shannon Pritting, IDS Project and Syracuse University Libraries
    • During the past year, the IDS Technology Development Team has created an automation and efficiency service, IDS Logic, for Interlibrary Loan that connects to ILLiad through a dynamic server addon. Although there is a great deal of automation already in ILLiad and Interlibrary loan, IDS Logic can help automate the complex parts of ILL that now require staff mediation. Using connections to a library’s tools (such as its z39.50 server) as well as connecting to external APIs and web services, IDS Logic can find and import information that is needed to enhance ILL efficiency. This presentation will feature what automation tools, such as Lending Availability Service, are ready for release, and future development plans will also be discussed.

 

10:15 a.m. – 11:00 a.m. – Session 2

  • Information Literacy Instruction and Assessment: A Collaborative Design
    • Carlos Arguelles, Kingsborough Community College, City University of New York
    • Immerse students in a multi-session library instruction to develop information literacy skills. A planned instruction with the collaboration of the course instructor to support a step by step course project. To make informed adjustments to the course plan and the activities of the library session a pre and post assessment was implemented. This approach is part of the course “Critical Issues in Community Health” at Kingsborough Community College of CUNY.
  • Teach Where They Live: Library and Residential Life Collaborations
    • Michelle Bishop, SUNY Oswego
    • New students arrive with varied experiences, perceptions, and expectations about academic work. Many have outdated or culturally different perceptions of libraries or are overconfident about their ability to perform academic research. Information literacy instruction for these students is uniquely challenging. In this session, a librarian from SUNY Oswego will detail how she partnered with Residence Life to develop outreach initiatives which address the information literacy needs of freshman, new international students, and new transfer students.
  • One Bib to Rule Them All – SUNY One Bib / Shared Catalog Project (10:15-12:00)
    • Marianne Hebert, Potsdam, Maggie Horn, OLIS, Kevin McCoy, Suffolk, Nancy Poehlmann, University at Albany, Maureen Zajkowski, OLIS, and Angela Rhodes
    • The Shared Catalog and Authorities Task Force has been working since Fall of 2012 to explore the feasibility of creating a merged SUNY Union Catalog. Since the Regional Meetings in Fall 2013, OLIS and Task Force Sub-groups have continued to work on several aspects of the migration with Fall 2014 being the target for the implementation of a test environment. The session will focus on progress of the One Bib Project and anticipated Fall 2014 activities such as designing and evaluating the test environment, creating campus data profiles and identifying training needs and processes. This is also an opportunity for campuses to ask questions and share concerns.
  • An Indispensable Role: the Department of AAAS and the University Libraries’ Win-win situation in 2013 NYCAS at Binghamton
    • Julie Wang and Leslie Vega, both of Binghamton University
    • Asian Studies is steadily increasing in popularity at Binghamton University. Every few years, the Department of Asian and Asian American Studies (AAAS) has hosted the New York Conference on Asian Studies (NYCAS) at Binghamton. This year, the University Libraries has taken the opportunity to reach out and volunteer as one of the conference sponsors. Librarians and staff from several units of the library worked collaboratively with the AAAS Department to promote the Libraries’ newly established Asian collection and to advocate the importance of global studies. The Libraries played an important role during this year long preparation. In conjunction with the 2013 NYCAS, the Libraries displayed a vendor book exhibit, an exhibit of Asian garden books, and a showcase of Asian art works in Special Collections. This successful cross campus collaboration involved multiple departments, and resulted in a gathering of over 150 scholars and graduate students, from this region and from abroad. The presenters will recapture the whole operation from initiation, outreach, communication, coordination, preparation, process, and outcome. Through this case study, we would like to share a firsthand experience with other SUNY colleagues who might be interested in interdepartmental collaboration on campus in the future.
  • Stone Soup: Build the Fire, Combine Ingredients, Taste, and Adjust Cancelled
    • Sara Hull and Heather Shalhoub, both of SUNY Empire State College
    • Sara and Heather will share their experiences collaborating with the Center for Mentoring and Learning, faculty instructional technologists, and curriculum instructional designers in support of faculty scholarship being conducted through the Institute for Mentoring, Teaching & Learning (IMTL) at Empire State College. The IMTL is in its second year, and consists of a 2-day summer residency to get projects off the ground, with year-long follow-up in support of those projects.
  • Testing and Tweaking Your Way to a Better Library Website: Improved User Experience without a Massive Site Overhaul
    • Rebecca Hyams, SUNY Maritime College
    • We typically design our library websites with the best of intentions, wanting our patrons to have easy access to all of our services. Frequently though, we encounter a disconnect between how we view our pages and how our patrons actually use them. With the implementation and launch for EDS approaching, the faculty of the SUNY Maritime Library decided it was an ideal time to collaborate with our users to make simple tweaks to improve our site’s usability. This presentation will explore how the SUNY Maritime Library performed a multi-dimensional study, our findings, and our resulting improvements.
  • Simplifying Borrowing Privileges to Improve Access and Accuracy
    • Nancy Abashian and Jill Dixon, both of Binghamton University
    • The Binghamton University Libraries’ Borrowing Privileges Committee, comprised of key Public Services staff, simplified the process of managing patron borrowing accounts. By reducing borrowing statuses from 11 to 5 and standardizing loan periods, the committee reduced confusion and errors in processing while streamlining policies, enhanced services for some categories, and created access to services previously denied to specific groups.
    • This presentation will illustrate the process used in consolidating borrower categories, the impact on patrons and staff, and the opportunity created for examining additional policies and proposing new workflows in lending and circulation.

 

11:15 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. – Session 3

  • The Cognitive Apprenticeship Model for Library Instruction
    • Elizabeth Tompkins, Kingsborough Community College
    • The cognitive apprentice model (CA), which links apprenticeship-learning techniques with classroom practices, offers a flexible framework for planning and implementing library sessions. Developed by Collins, Brown, and Newman (1989), CA illuminates the thought process of teachers and other experts while they deliver instruction in problem solving, close reading, critical thinking, or other higher order reasoning. My application of CA utilizes the model to break down the thought process associated with library research into components that are comprehensible to all levels of students.
  • Disciplinary Discussions: Articulating and Integrating Information Literacy Outcomes
    • Julia Furay, Kingsborough Community College, Jonathan Cope, College of Staten Island, Jesus Sanabria, Bronx Community College, and Amy Stempler, College of Staten Island
    • What does an information literate student look like by the time they graduate? The answer, of course, depends on discipline. This project is an attempt to help librarians work with teaching faculty in their own institutions to articulate discipline-specific learning outcomes for students at 120 credits. These presenters, all CUNY librarians, will discuss the theoretical backing to this concept, as well as its implementation through a series of focus group conversations with departmental faculty.
  • One Bib to Rule Them All – SUNY One Bib / Shared Catalog Project (continued)
    • Marianne Hebert, Potsdam, Maggie Horn, OLIS, Kevin McCoy, Suffolk, Nancy Poehlmann, University at Albany, and Maureen Zajkowski, OLIS
    • The Shared Catalog and Authorities Task Force has been working since Fall of 2012 to explore the feasibility of creating a merged SUNY Union Catalog. Since the Regional Meetings in Fall 2013, OLIS and Task Force Sub-groups have continued to work on several aspects of the migration with Fall 2014 being the target for the implementation of a test environment. The session will focus on progress of the One Bib Project and anticipated Fall 2014 activities such as designing and evaluating the test environment, creating campus data profiles and identifying training needs and processes. This is also an opportunity for campuses to ask questions and share concerns.
  • Capturing Historic Voices: Forging Partnerships in the Digital Age
    • Mike Magilligan, SUNY Canton
    • In this conference presentation SUNY Canton’s Digital Technologies and Learning Librarian Mike Magilligan will discuss his experience in establishing Canton’s Veterans Oral History Project. This digital archive has been the product of partnerships between the college and various community, civic, and nonprofit organizations. In this presentation Mike will discuss the planning, networking, and public relations strategies that led to the successful launch of this project. This archive has also been innovative in its value as a tool for cross collaborations with Canton’s humanities division and the presentation will address the pedagogical applications that this archive allows for.
  • Reference Resources in SUNY Libraries: Future Empire Collaborations?
    • Jane Kessler and Carol Anderson, both of University at Albany
    • As the use of print reference collections decreases, and reference collection budgets are allocated to online resources supporting reference services, we collectively need to look ahead to what the reference collection of the 21st century should look like and how SUNY libraries could enhance collaboration and sharing of online reference resources. As a starting point, the presentation will provide an overview of UAlbany’s University Library’s reference collection weeding and fund reallocation project, transitioning from print resources to enhanced access to online reference resources.
  • Discover and Learn Together: a Review of the EDS Implementation Process
    • Abby Smith, SUNY Potsdam and Kristy Lee, SUNY New Paltz
    • The presentation will walk participants through the process of setting up the EBSCO discovery service, including both technical and logistical considerations. We will review areas that are unexpectedly challenging, which elements took more time than anticipated, and the decisions involved in the early stages of implementation.
  • Promoting the Value of Special Collections: A Subject Librarians’ Approach
    • Anne Larrivee and Leslie Vega, both of Binghamton University Libraries
    • Special Collections is the hidden heart of every library. These unique collections endure against the ever-changing scope and mission of academic libraries, where fiscal pressures threaten collections toward homogeneity. Unfortunately, Special Collections – the rare books, manuscripts, and archives of a university – often go unnoticed by the general student body. During this presentation, two subject librarians will discuss a variety of approaches they have used to promote Special Collections to both students and faculty. These approaches include promotion via instruction classes, the reference desk, social media channels and library exhibitions, as well as partnering with Special Collections on projects.
  • Enhancing the Curriculum Through The New York Times Academic Site License
    • Kevin J. Cappallo, The New York Times
    • Learn how both faculty and students can benefit from campus wide digital access to The New York Times through The New York Times Academic Site License Program. Explore our customized education websites, NYTimes in Education, NYTimes in Leadership and NYTimes in First Year. The New York Times brings the world to you; let it be your textbook and see how much is applicable across the entire curriculum.

 

1:45 p.m. – 2:30 p.m. – Session 4

  • Incorporating Information Literacy in the Majors: New Roles for Librarians
    • Trudi Jacobson, Jesus Alonso-Regalado, and Patricia Pinho, all of University at Albany
    • The University at Albany has a new requirement that academic departments must ensure that students in their majors meet upper level competencies (information literacy, advanced writing, oral discourse, and critical thinking). Moving responsibility to departments for this type of learning is happening at an increasing number of institutions. This can be a difficult transition, but provides the opportunity for conversation and collaboration. Learn how librarians at UAlbany were involved in the process, and what steps they took, at both the institutional and departmental levels, to facilitate a quality outcome. Hear, too, from a faculty member about how her department addressed this addition to the major.
  • ACRL’s Assessment in Action: Assessing Library Instruction, Collaborating across Campus and What We’ve Learned So Far
    • Kenneth R. Wierzbowski and Jennifer Kegler, both of the College at Brockport
    • The Drake Memorial Library is 1 of 75 libraries across North America to participate in ACRL’s Assessment in Action program. The 14-month program entails the development and implementation of an action learning project examining the library’s impact on student success and contribution to assessment activities on campus. Brockport’s 4 person team includes members from outside of the library to foster cross-campus collaboration. In this presentation, librarians on the team will discuss impressions with the program so far, some of the pitfalls and triumphs faced developing the project, and experiences in working with faculty and staff across campus.
  • Tag, You’re It: Enhancing Access to Graphic Novels
    • Wendy West, University at Albany
    • This presentation examines social tagging as aid for access to graphic novel titles in the discovery layer catalogs. In this project, the catalogs of a group of Association of Research Libraries were reviewed to determine if they offered social tagging options and, if they were, whether their users were applying social tags to records identifying materials as graphic novels. The presentation also discusses such issues as specific patterns in the tagging terminology and metadata used by catalogers to identify graphic novels.
  • Reading Habits Across Disciplines: A Study of Student eBook Use
    • Lee A. Cummings, Anne Larrivee, and Leslie Vega, all of Binghamton University
    • The advantages to choosing a title in electronic over print format have been widely publicized: saved shelf space, no lost or damaged materials, and concurrent access between unique users. But do these users have a preference? And if so, why? To begin to answer these questions, subject librarians from Binghamton University surveyed students in various fields of study. The resulting data offers some insights into what’s most important to students when using print or electronic books, and gives librarians information that can be used to improve the effectiveness of their collections.
  • Uncovering Discovery: Collaboration between Systems and Reference at Sojourner Truth Library
    • Lauren Marcus, Valerie Mittenberg, and Kristy Lee, all of SUNY New Paltz
    • Web scale discovery systems have been around for several years and the list of commercial vendors continues to grow annually. These systems promise more efficient scholarly research and increased access to collections far beyond library walls or even the library catalog. Yet academic librarians do not equally embrace these new research models. While IT specialists welcome the streamlined maintenance of “one click” search bars, out-of-the-box systems rarely meet the needs of academic libraries and require extensive customization. In addition, relevancy rankings may prioritize access to electronic resources, while diminishing access to print holdings. For these reasons, many reference librarians are hesitant to adopt the consumer-centric search model promoted by these systems. In January 2014, the Sojourner Truth Library (STL) implemented the “soft launch” of its EBSCO Discovery Service. This presentation discusses the collaboration between Reference and Systems Librarians at STL on the evaluation, selection, and customization of the EDS product. Topics of concern include: control over relevancy rankings, advanced search functionality, enhanced access to local holdings, and integration into bibliographic instruction.
  • New Technologies, Collaboration, and Entrepreneurship in Libraries: Harnessing Their Power to Help Your Library
    • Stephanie Walker, Dr. Howard Spivak, and Alex Rudshteyn, all of Brooklyn College, City University of New York
    • Academic libraries are caught in budget squeezes and struggle to communicate value to senior administration. At Brooklyn College, we’ve taken an unusual approach. Our technology staff work directly with librarians to develop products that meet user needs. We’ve developed 8 products, including an award-winning content management system (4MyLibrary) and a user-friendly book scanner. Recently, we started selling 2 products: our book scanners (at half the price of commercial alternatives), and a hosting service, whereby we host and support 4MyLibrary for libraries with minimal technology staff. Both yielded major benefits. We hope to spur broader technology collaboration among libraries.
  • Constructing a “Shared Services” Interlibrary Loan Department: A Narrative
    • Glen Bogardus, SUNY Canton and SUNY Potsdam Shared Services
    • As part of the campuses’ “Shared Services” initiative, the SUNY Canton and SUNY Potsdam libraries jointly hired an Interlibrary Loan Specialist in 2012. The ILL Specialist was charged with uniting the two campuses’ ILL departments, using merged resources to ensure quality ILL service to each institution, while capitalizing on these new cooperative resources to rejuvenate and expand existing document delivery services.
    • This presentation is a narrative account of the ILL Specialist’s efforts to build the newly conceived shared ILL service. In particular, the Specialist will discuss challenges faced in managing the merged library department while tailoring services to the distinct needs of each SUNY college—each with its own unique patron population and identity.

 

2:30 p.m. – 3:30 p.m. – Poster Sessions

 

3:30 p.m. – 4:15 p.m. – Session 5

  • Discovering Digital Collections
    • Brenda Hazard, Hudson Valley Community College, Katie Jezik, Hudson Valley Community College, Maggie Horn, SUNY Office of Library and Information Services, and Susan D’Entremont, Capital District Library Council
    • Hudson Valley Community College has been contributing digitized archival materials to New York Heritage, a research portal for accessing documents about historical New York State, for several years. As HVCC planned for its EBSCO Discovery Service (EDS) implementation, they realized they could make their digital collection more visible to their campus community and beyond. Hear from your colleagues at HVCC, who collaborated with the SUNY Office of Library and Information Services (SUNY OLIS) and the Capital District Library Council (CDLC), to learn about the steps they took to explore incorporating their NYHeritage Digital Collection into EDS, the lessons learned along the way, and how others can benefit from their experience to increase visibility and use of their digital collections.
  • Library Stress-Relievers Ease Student Anxieties during Finals Week
    • Dr. Ray L. Morrison, SUNY Oswego
    • Finals Week can be extremely stressful time for many college and university students.  However, students at Penfield Library (SUNY Oswego) are treated to a variety of services to help them de-stress during this harried time period. Some of these activities include free coffee and donuts, ear plugs, puzzles, massages, dog therapy, additional hours of assistance at the reference desk and hours the library is open.  This session will discuss ways other colleges and universities provide stress-free services.  Finally, there will be a time for participants to share stress-relieving techniques used in their libraries.
  • Assessment Strategies for Technical Services
    • Rebecca Mugridge and Nancy Poehlmann, both of University at Albany
    • The assessment of technical services activities is often limited to gathering and reporting statistics. This presentation goes beyond statistics and addresses a variety of qualitative assessment activities that can be useful in any technical services operation, large or small. When conducted regularly and methodically, qualitative assessment practices can help managers and administrators understand the impact and value of the work that we do for our customers, and improve our effectiveness. This presentation will address a variety of qualitative assessment techniques: workflow analysis, customer service surveys, focus groups, quality initiatives, benchmarking, and other methods.
  • EBSCO eBooks: The Latest Enhancements and Collections for Academic Libraries
    • Jim Kropelin and Amy Levine, both of EBSCO Information Services
    • Join EBSCO Information Services for an informative and exciting session covering the latest EBSCO eBook news and enhancements. Topics include: newly released subject sets for purchase, new subscription collections, and the latest EBSCO eBook enhancements. EBSCO has developed new subject-specific collections for subscription. Providing unlimited access at a very reasonable subscription cost, these new collections include: History, Nursing, Business, and Education. EBSCO has also upgraded our patron-driven acquisition (PDA) model, and the ability to suppress titles based on usage. We hope you are able to attend this session with us.
  • A “Commons within a Commons:” Data-Driven Service Planning for Graduate Students
    • Eugene J. Harvey, Assessment Librarian and Maureen A. Lindstrom, both of SUNY Buffalo State
    • Although only in the beginning stages, E. H. Butler Library ultimately envisions the creation of a Graduate Commons, modeled after its successful Information Commons established in 2006. As the planning process unfolds, this innovative “Commons-within-a-Commons” approach may feature personalized research services during a student’s thesis-writing stage, customized instruction, dedicated learning spaces, tailored technology support, and librarian-graduate faculty collaborations. The presentation will highlight LibQUAL+® findings, the methodology behind the planning process, current implementations, future directions, and ongoing assessment strategies. Attendee outcomes center on: 1) using data to guide decision making, 2) aligning services to specific user needs, 3) creatively deploying human resources to enact planning initiatives, and 4) closing the loop on assessment outcomes.
  • Long-Term Preservation of Digital Objects: Developing a Plan without Losing Your Mind
    • Kathryn Frederick, Skidmore College
    • This presentation will explain how Skidmore College developed a plan for the long-term preservation of digital files. I will give an overview of digital preservation, discuss what types of files and metadata we are preserving, the tools we are using to do it, and the process I used to develop the plan.
  • Evaluating Student Workforce Performance
    • Andrew Lyons, University at Albany
    • Managing a student workforce to best provide technical and other support in an Information Commons environment can be a challenge. Supervisors need to evaluate student employee performance, make decisions about coverage for support locations, and mentor their workers. The challenge is in collecting useful and balanced performance metrics and other information, then providing the results in an appropriate, timely, and productive manner so that student employees can be successful immediately and perform to their potential in the longer term. We will discuss the methods and tools used by UAlbany ITS-Client Support Services to collect and evaluate metrics as well as how we provide feedback to our student employees so that we can best help all users of our resources.

 

Friday, June 13th

10:45 a.m. – 11:30 a.m. – Session 1

  • Against Speed Dating: Collaboration in Cataloging an Historical Collection
    • Jessica Ernye and David Mitchell, both of University at Albany
    • The Miriam Snow Mathes Historical Children’s Literature Collection of SUNY Albany, includes over 15,000 children’s books and periodicals published in the 19th century and up to 1960. The Mathes Collection provides children’s books that are generally no longer available in a standard children’s library collection today. Proper and in-depth physical description of the book, especially edition and printing dates, correct subject analysis, as well as the safety and security of the books during transport between buildings, were all concerns when this collaborative project began. Ms. Ernye and Mr. Mitchell will present on the partnership between Cataloging and Special Collections in regards to the cataloging of these materials. How this collaboration benefits both cataloger and curator, the preservation of materials, the quality of the bibliographic records, as well as how this alliance contributes to the library’s mission, will also be discussed.
  • An IL-integrated Gen Ed Course and Students’ Continued Use of the University Libraries’ Web Portal
    • Yu-Hui Chen, University at Albany
    • Researchers have indicated that user training plays an important role in facilitating technology acceptance and use. The “Internet and Information Access” is one of the semester-long, 3-credit information literacy integrated Gen Ed courses. Every semester the class attracts a mix of 200-400 undergraduate students from various academic programs and grade levels. Using students enrolled in this course as the research population, I investigated if students would continue using the University Libraries’ Web portal after their completion of the course.
  • Rockin’ the Res Halls
    • Carrie Fishner, SUNY Delhi
    • This presentation will primarily be a discussion about the possible partnerships that exist between the residence halls and the library/librarians on campus. I had an 8 year background in Residence Life before switching my career track to librarianship, and would like to offer up some of the experiences I have gained in creating this mutually beneficial partnership. What programming can work in the residence halls, and why this is something libraries should seek out will be two of our main discussion points. Residence Halls and campus libraries should not be at odds with each other!
  • What Was News When: NYS Historical Newspapers
    • Laura Osterhout, Rochester Regional Library Council and John Hammond, Northern New York Library Network
    • The NY 3Rs Association, Inc. collaborates with libraries, archives, and museums across the state on projects that expand access to all of New York’s information and cultural resources. NYS Historical Newspapers (nyshistoricalnewspapers.org) is a growing collaboration that brings together digitized historical newspapers using the Chronam platform, the same platform used by the Library of Congress’s Chronicling America project. Over two million pages to date have been digitized, OCR’d and placed on the site. During this session we’ll discuss this project, how it operates, how the site can be used, and how organizations from around the state can participate.
  • Starting a Bike Library
    • Stephen Weiter, SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry
    • In 2013, the student cycling club came to the library and asked for help establishing a bike library, so that students could borrow bikes for use around town. We agreed to help facilitate this program. This presentation will detail the considerations and planning involved, and how we set up the library. I will talk about what worked, what didn’t, and lessons learned when establishing innovative or non-traditional services.
  • Gathering Expertise: Designing a Library Orientation Game with Cross-Campus Partners
    • Elizabeth Andrews, SUNY Potsdam
    • What if you have an amazing idea for a new program or service, but don’t have the in-house expertise to pull it off? Learn how the SUNY Potsdam College Libraries partnered with campus offices, faculty members, and graduate students to design and build a new first-year orientation game. Library Quest, which consists of an online game, physical scavenger hunt, and follow-up quiz, was successfully completed by over 350 freshmen during Fall 2013.
  • Informing the Past, Present, and Future
    • Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America: Ellen Kushner, Delia Sherman, Laura Anne Gilman, Chuck Rothman, Carrie Cuinn, Ryk E. Spoor
    • From fashion to tanks, science fiction and fantasy has informed the mainstream world in many ways. We use Star Trek technology every day, the government employs SF authors to advise on issues of national security, and a luxury chocolatier created a line based on the Hunger Games movies. Leading science fiction and fantasy authors will discuss the impact of the genre on li so far, and its potential to shape our future.

 

11:45 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. – Session 2

  • Assessment Tools for Online Courses and Programs
    • Kabel Stanwicks, University at Albany
    • Valid and reliable measurement and assessment tools are needed for evaluation and quality assurance purposes for online courses and programs (Chaney et al., 2007; Nord, 2011; Zhang & Cheng, 2011). Quality assurance is a major challenge faced by higher education (Shelton, 2010). Black et al. argue that distance education administrators and teachers need to understand the assessment tools available to them to better understand students and maximize students’ potential for successful learning (Black et al., 2008). This presentation will review a range of models and resources related to quality assurance in online education and promote discussion of the benefits and limitations of each.
  • By the Book: Reader Advisory for Student Readers
    • Presenter Brian Nielsen
    • College students don’t stop reading leisure materials when they get to campus, yet librarians often overlook selecting resources to meet this need. This presentation will focus on how to stay current on readers’ advisory in the college environment. The presenter will discuss publishing trends and selections that will help to enhance your collections and entice your reader population.
  • Tutorial Teamwork: Collaborating to Design Resilient Videos
    • Brandon West and Emily Thompson, both of State University of New York at Oswego
    • Video tutorials continue to be a necessity for information literacy instruction. Librarians at SUNY Oswego have developed a team-based approach to video tutorial creation centered on instructional design principles. The result has been a streamlined video creation process that is manageable, produces higher quality video tutorials, and has fostered librarian video creation skills. This session will focus on using instructional design to develop concept-based videos that can be integrated in a myriad of library services.
  • Exploring the Art and Artistry of Picture Books
    • Dr. Kelly Wissman, University at Albany
    • Picture books have long delighted readers with their unique blend of illustrations and narrative text. While picture books bring together two distinct sign systems, art and written language, we often tend to overlook their artistic elements and peritextual features when sharing them with young readers. In this session, an associate professor of Education will introduce participants to the artistic elements of picture books and will share how she incorporates picture books into her work with in-service and pre-service K-6 teachers. Participants will explore how bringing an artistic lens to the reading of picture books can deepen their aesthetic and affective impact.
  • From Bound to Found: How the Fashion Institute of Technology and the New York Public Library Presented, Preserved, and Promoted the André Studios Fashion Sketch Collection
    • Karen Trivette Cannell, Fashion Institute of Technology (SUNY)
    • For decades, both FIT and NYPL Picture Collection held on their respective shelves bound volumes of beautiful fashion sketches from the André Studios fashion sketch subscription service. The sketches represented the highest styles emanating from Paris and inherent to American taste from 1930 until circa 1970. As bound volumes located in different institutions, access was cumbersome, severely limited, and tested the preservation of the rare content. Through a METRO grant, FIT and NYPL collaborated to digitally reunite a large sample of the sketches making them far more accessible and to a much wider audience while securing their preservation over the long term. The presenter will discuss the project and its outcomes due to the successful collaboration between the institutions.
  • Value of Open Educational Resources and Open Textbooks
    • Cyril Oberlander, SUNY Geneseo, Steve Weiter, SUNY College of Environmental Science & Forestry, and Kate Pitcher, SUNY Geneseo
    • What are OERs and open textbooks? Do they matter for students, faculty, and/or librarians? Participate in a discussion and presentation about possibilities for librarians and libraries to provide value in collaborating with faculty using and publishing open access resources, and making a positive impact on the cost of a college education. Some say scope creep, others say libraries can provide an essential value and services that supports teaching and learning. Examples from Open SUNY Textbook and other programs will be discussed. Bring your ideas and questions, discuss the significant opportunities, problems, service gaps and possible roles libraries and librarians can play.
  • Information Infrastructure for New York State (I2NY) Project and Beyond Q & A: What’s in it for SUNY Libraries and Other Academics?
    • Mary-Carol Lindbloom, South Central Regional Library Council
    • Information Infrastructure for New York State (I2NY) is an initiative sponsored and coordinated by the NY 3Rs Association Inc. (NY3Rs), comprised of six multifaceted projects: Enhancing Access to Research Data Bases; Empire State Digital Network/Digital Public Library of America Hub; Library as Publisher; Library Assessment and Return on Investment; Communications Clearinghouse; and Staffing Innovations. Beyond I2NY, the NY3Rs lead other initiatives and programs including AskUs 24/7 virtual reference service, now in its 11th year of service to the library users of New York State. This session provides an overview of the various NY3Rs projects. What are we learning and producing? How can you get involved? Attend our session and find out!
  • E-portfolios for Student Veterans: A Collaborative and Multidisciplinary Approach Within the Library
    • Krista Gruber and Susan Lieberthal, both of Suffolk County Community College
    • With funding from a SUNY Innovative Instructional Technology Grant, librarians, faculty from the English and Communications Departments, and the Educational Technology Unit at Suffolk County Community College’s (SCCC) Ammerman Campus embarked upon a project to help student veterans integrate academically and socially into college life. Participating student veterans collaborated in a newly dedicated library space to create e-portfolios using Google Sites. The project is designed to afford a multifaceted opportunity for students to hone writing skills, increase information literacy, learn video editing skills, build faculty and student support systems, and create a professional online presence that could endure beyond his or her tenure at SCCC. Our presentation will describe the progress and challenges of the project during the 2013-14 academic year.

 

1:45 p.m. – 2:30 p.m. – Session 3

  • From Superhero Rings to Tangled Plastic Spaghetti: Our Year With a 3D Printer
    • Kenneth R. Wierzbowski, Kim H. Myers, Gregory M. Toth, and Wendy Prince, all of The College at Brockport
    • The College at Brockport acquired a MakerBot Replicator 2 in the summer of 2013. The initial excitement was quickly tempered by questions of logistics, management, application, and policy. The following semesters were an effort to answer these questions, establish a place for the 3D printer in the library, and garner interest on campus from students, faculty and staff. We will discuss the challenges we encountered as we moved from a knick-knack factory to active faculty and student involvement.
  • Collaborating Across Campus: Organizing a Successful Program Without Grant Funding
    • Katrina Frazier and Lisa Errico, both of Nassau Community College
    • Two faculty members from the A. Holly Patterson Library at Nassau Community College will discuss how the experience of not being awarded a grant to celebrate Banned Books Week turned into a positive development. Through creative and integrative approaches, the NCC Library Banned Books Week Committee was able to secure funding through alternate sources. Interestingly, as planning for the series of programs evolved, a campus-wide collaborative effort developed that included representation from a variety of constituencies on campus. In addition to campus-wide recognition for the Library, the end-result of such teamwork resulted in one of A. Holly Patterson Library’s most successful endeavors.
  • Transformative Writing Experiences
    • Jeffrey Berman, University at Albany
    • Jeffrey Berman will be speaking about how students who write about their personal experiences with love and loss can reach important educational and psychological insights into their lives. Such writing can be both transformative and therapeutic for everyone in the classroom, including the teacher. These classroom experiences have informed his book publications.
  • Let’s Review Reviews
    • Brandon West and Tina Chan, both of SUNY Oswego
    • One of the best opportunities in librarianship is writing book reviews. Writing book reviews is an easy method for starting an academic writing career. This activity also provides a venue for keeping up with current literature, whether leisure reading or for a particular collection. The speakers will provide some tips and insights into writing reviews since they are experienced in reviewing materials for Choice, Library Journal, and Children’s Literature Comprehensive Database.
  • The Story of Our Livelihoods: Salary Comparisons at Buffalo State
    • Eugene J. Harvey and Marianne Foley, both of SUNY Buffalo State
    • For over a decade, SUNYLA has investigated salary disparity between librarians and non-library faculty, and they continue to advocate for equitable librarian salaries across SUNY. Despite these efforts, change is slow, if at all, and librarians’ salaries continue to lag — sometimes at an alarmingly disparate level. At Buffalo State, faculty librarians have compared their own salaries to other Masters-level faculty on campus, and furthermore they examined job descriptions and other unions’ salary pay grades of NYS civil service librarians in comparable roles. All findings were presented to various campus administrators to foster awareness and dialogue, and these endeavors and results will be shared here. Join the presenters to learn about the methodology behind the comparisons, what the data indicate, possible remediation, and how your own library can advocate for equitable salaries.
  • Enhancing the User Experience: A Look into the Overhaul of E. H. Butler Library’s Website
    • Katherine Bertel and Chris Parana, both of Buffalo State
    • The web has become much more dynamic and interactive in recent times. We see an opportunity for libraries to adhere to the same design principles used by popular websites, to create a more intuitive, dynamic, and enjoyable user experience. In our presentation, we will discuss the results from usability testing after a website redesign in 2012 (library.buffalostate.edu), our guiding design principles, and solutions to enhancing user experience, such as responsive web design, unified searching, and transitional interfaces. The goal is to create an engaging experience that draws users in, encourages usage, and inspires discovery.
  • Foreign Gods, Inc.
    • Okey Ndibe, author
    • Okey Ndibe, author of the recent Foreign Gods, Inc., will talk about his experiences as a novelist, political columnist, and essayist. Janet Maslin of The New York Times wrote of Foreign Gods, “Razor-sharp… Mr. Ndibe invests his story with enough dark comedy to make Ngene an odoriferous presence in his own right, and certainly not the kind of polite exotic rarity that art collectors are used to… In Mr. Ndibe’s agile hands, he’s both a source of satire and an embodiment of pure terror.”