Sessions – Friday, June 13

Friday, June 13th

10:45 a.m. – 11:30 a.m. – Session 1

  • Against Speed Dating: Collaboration in Cataloging an Historical Collection
    • Jessica Ernye and David Mitchell, both of University at Albany
    • The Miriam Snow Mathes Historical Children’s Literature Collection of SUNY Albany, includes over 15,000 children’s books and periodicals published in the 19th century and up to 1960. The Mathes Collection provides children’s books that are generally no longer available in a standard children’s library collection today. Proper and in-depth physical description of the book, especially edition and printing dates, correct subject analysis, as well as the safety and security of the books during transport between buildings, were all concerns when this collaborative project began. Ms. Ernye and Mr. Mitchell will present on the partnership between Cataloging and Special Collections in regards to the cataloging of these materials. How this collaboration benefits both cataloger and curator, the preservation of materials, the quality of the bibliographic records, as well as how this alliance contributes to the library’s mission, will also be discussed.
  • An IL-integrated Gen Ed Course and Students’ Continued Use of the University Libraries’ Web Portal
    • Yu-Hui Chen, University at Albany
    • Researchers have indicated that user training plays an important role in facilitating technology acceptance and use. The “Internet and Information Access” is one of the semester-long, 3-credit information literacy integrated Gen Ed courses. Every semester the class attracts a mix of 200-400 undergraduate students from various academic programs and grade levels. Using students enrolled in this course as the research population, I investigated if students would continue using the University Libraries’ Web portal after their completion of the course.
  • Rockin’ the Res Halls
    • Carrie Fishner, SUNY Delhi
    • This presentation will primarily be a discussion about the possible partnerships that exist between the residence halls and the library/librarians on campus. I had an 8 year background in Residence Life before switching my career track to librarianship, and would like to offer up some of the experiences I have gained in creating this mutually beneficial partnership. What programming can work in the residence halls, and why this is something libraries should seek out will be two of our main discussion points. Residence Halls and campus libraries should not be at odds with each other!
  • What Was News When: NYS Historical Newspapers
    • Laura Osterhout, Rochester Regional Library Council and John Hammond, Northern New York Library Network
    • The NY 3Rs Association, Inc. collaborates with libraries, archives, and museums across the state on projects that expand access to all of New York’s information and cultural resources. NYS Historical Newspapers (nyshistoricalnewspapers.org) is a growing collaboration that brings together digitized historical newspapers using the Chronam platform, the same platform used by the Library of Congress’s Chronicling America project. Over two million pages to date have been digitized, OCR’d and placed on the site. During this session we’ll discuss this project, how it operates, how the site can be used, and how organizations from around the state can participate.
  • Starting a Bike Library
    • Stephen Weiter, SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry
    • In 2013, the student cycling club came to the library and asked for help establishing a bike library, so that students could borrow bikes for use around town. We agreed to help facilitate this program. This presentation will detail the considerations and planning involved, and how we set up the library. I will talk about what worked, what didn’t, and lessons learned when establishing innovative or non-traditional services.
  • Gathering Expertise: Designing a Library Orientation Game with Cross-Campus Partners
    • Elizabeth Andrews, SUNY Potsdam
    • What if you have an amazing idea for a new program or service, but don’t have the in-house expertise to pull it off? Learn how the SUNY Potsdam College Libraries partnered with campus offices, faculty members, and graduate students to design and build a new first-year orientation game. Library Quest, which consists of an online game, physical scavenger hunt, and follow-up quiz, was successfully completed by over 350 freshmen during Fall 2013.
  • Informing the Past, Present, and Future
    • Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America: Ellen Kushner, Delia Sherman, Laura Anne Gilman, Chuck Rothman, Carrie Cuinn, Ryk E. Spoor
    • From fashion to tanks, science fiction and fantasy has informed the mainstream world in many ways. We use Star Trek technology every day, the government employs SF authors to advise on issues of national security, and a luxury chocolatier created a line based on the Hunger Games movies. Leading science fiction and fantasy authors will discuss the impact of the genre on li so far, and its potential to shape our future.

 

11:45 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. – Session 2

  • Assessment Tools for Online Courses and Programs
    • Kabel Stanwicks, University at Albany
    • Valid and reliable measurement and assessment tools are needed for evaluation and quality assurance purposes for online courses and programs (Chaney et al., 2007; Nord, 2011; Zhang & Cheng, 2011). Quality assurance is a major challenge faced by higher education (Shelton, 2010). Black et al. argue that distance education administrators and teachers need to understand the assessment tools available to them to better understand students and maximize students’ potential for successful learning (Black et al., 2008). This presentation will review a range of models and resources related to quality assurance in online education and promote discussion of the benefits and limitations of each.
  • By the Book: Reader Advisory for Student Readers
    • Presenter Brian Nielsen
    • College students don’t stop reading leisure materials when they get to campus, yet librarians often overlook selecting resources to meet this need. This presentation will focus on how to stay current on readers’ advisory in the college environment. The presenter will discuss publishing trends and selections that will help to enhance your collections and entice your reader population.
  • Tutorial Teamwork: Collaborating to Design Resilient Videos
    • Brandon West and Emily Thompson, both of State University of New York at Oswego
    • Video tutorials continue to be a necessity for information literacy instruction. Librarians at SUNY Oswego have developed a team-based approach to video tutorial creation centered on instructional design principles. The result has been a streamlined video creation process that is manageable, produces higher quality video tutorials, and has fostered librarian video creation skills. This session will focus on using instructional design to develop concept-based videos that can be integrated in a myriad of library services.
  • Exploring the Art and Artistry of Picture Books
    • Dr. Kelly Wissman, University at Albany
    • Picture books have long delighted readers with their unique blend of illustrations and narrative text. While picture books bring together two distinct sign systems, art and written language, we often tend to overlook their artistic elements and peritextual features when sharing them with young readers. In this session, an associate professor of Education will introduce participants to the artistic elements of picture books and will share how she incorporates picture books into her work with in-service and pre-service K-6 teachers. Participants will explore how bringing an artistic lens to the reading of picture books can deepen their aesthetic and affective impact.
  • From Bound to Found: How the Fashion Institute of Technology and the New York Public Library Presented, Preserved, and Promoted the André Studios Fashion Sketch Collection
    • Karen Trivette Cannell, Fashion Institute of Technology (SUNY)
    • For decades, both FIT and NYPL Picture Collection held on their respective shelves bound volumes of beautiful fashion sketches from the André Studios fashion sketch subscription service. The sketches represented the highest styles emanating from Paris and inherent to American taste from 1930 until circa 1970. As bound volumes located in different institutions, access was cumbersome, severely limited, and tested the preservation of the rare content. Through a METRO grant, FIT and NYPL collaborated to digitally reunite a large sample of the sketches making them far more accessible and to a much wider audience while securing their preservation over the long term. The presenter will discuss the project and its outcomes due to the successful collaboration between the institutions.
  • Value of Open Educational Resources and Open Textbooks
    • Cyril Oberlander, SUNY Geneseo, Steve Weiter, SUNY College of Environmental Science & Forestry, and Kate Pitcher, SUNY Geneseo
    • What are OERs and open textbooks? Do they matter for students, faculty, and/or librarians? Participate in a discussion and presentation about possibilities for librarians and libraries to provide value in collaborating with faculty using and publishing open access resources, and making a positive impact on the cost of a college education. Some say scope creep, others say libraries can provide an essential value and services that supports teaching and learning. Examples from Open SUNY Textbook and other programs will be discussed. Bring your ideas and questions, discuss the significant opportunities, problems, service gaps and possible roles libraries and librarians can play.
  • Information Infrastructure for New York State (I2NY) Project and Beyond Q & A: What’s in it for SUNY Libraries and Other Academics?
    • Mary-Carol Lindbloom, South Central Regional Library Council
    • Information Infrastructure for New York State (I2NY) is an initiative sponsored and coordinated by the NY 3Rs Association Inc. (NY3Rs), comprised of six multifaceted projects: Enhancing Access to Research Data Bases; Empire State Digital Network/Digital Public Library of America Hub; Library as Publisher; Library Assessment and Return on Investment; Communications Clearinghouse; and Staffing Innovations. Beyond I2NY, the NY3Rs lead other initiatives and programs including AskUs 24/7 virtual reference service, now in its 11th year of service to the library users of New York State. This session provides an overview of the various NY3Rs projects. What are we learning and producing? How can you get involved? Attend our session and find out!
  • E-portfolios for Student Veterans: A Collaborative and Multidisciplinary Approach Within the Library
    • Krista Gruber and Susan Lieberthal, both of Suffolk County Community College
    • With funding from a SUNY Innovative Instructional Technology Grant, librarians, faculty from the English and Communications Departments, and the Educational Technology Unit at Suffolk County Community College’s (SCCC) Ammerman Campus embarked upon a project to help student veterans integrate academically and socially into college life. Participating student veterans collaborated in a newly dedicated library space to create e-portfolios using Google Sites. The project is designed to afford a multifaceted opportunity for students to hone writing skills, increase information literacy, learn video editing skills, build faculty and student support systems, and create a professional online presence that could endure beyond his or her tenure at SCCC. Our presentation will describe the progress and challenges of the project during the 2013-14 academic year.

 

1:45 p.m. – 2:30 p.m. – Session 3

  • From Superhero Rings to Tangled Plastic Spaghetti: Our Year With a 3D Printer
    • Kenneth R. Wierzbowski, Kim H. Myers, Gregory M. Toth, and Wendy Prince, all of The College at Brockport
    • The College at Brockport acquired a MakerBot Replicator 2 in the summer of 2013. The initial excitement was quickly tempered by questions of logistics, management, application, and policy. The following semesters were an effort to answer these questions, establish a place for the 3D printer in the library, and garner interest on campus from students, faculty and staff. We will discuss the challenges we encountered as we moved from a knick-knack factory to active faculty and student involvement.
  • Collaborating Across Campus: Organizing a Successful Program Without Grant Funding
    • Katrina Frazier and Lisa Errico, both of Nassau Community College
    • Two faculty members from the A. Holly Patterson Library at Nassau Community College will discuss how the experience of not being awarded a grant to celebrate Banned Books Week turned into a positive development. Through creative and integrative approaches, the NCC Library Banned Books Week Committee was able to secure funding through alternate sources. Interestingly, as planning for the series of programs evolved, a campus-wide collaborative effort developed that included representation from a variety of constituencies on campus. In addition to campus-wide recognition for the Library, the end-result of such teamwork resulted in one of A. Holly Patterson Library’s most successful endeavors.
  • Transformative Writing Experiences
    • Jeffrey Berman, University at Albany
    • Jeffrey Berman will be speaking about how students who write about their personal experiences with love and loss can reach important educational and psychological insights into their lives. Such writing can be both transformative and therapeutic for everyone in the classroom, including the teacher. These classroom experiences have informed his book publications.
  • Let’s Review Reviews
    • Brandon West and Tina Chan, both of SUNY Oswego
    • One of the best opportunities in librarianship is writing book reviews. Writing book reviews is an easy method for starting an academic writing career. This activity also provides a venue for keeping up with current literature, whether leisure reading or for a particular collection. The speakers will provide some tips and insights into writing reviews since they are experienced in reviewing materials for Choice, Library Journal, and Children’s Literature Comprehensive Database.
  • The Story of Our Livelihoods: Salary Comparisons at Buffalo State
    • Eugene J. Harvey and Marianne Foley, both of SUNY Buffalo State
    • For over a decade, SUNYLA has investigated salary disparity between librarians and non-library faculty, and they continue to advocate for equitable librarian salaries across SUNY. Despite these efforts, change is slow, if at all, and librarians’ salaries continue to lag — sometimes at an alarmingly disparate level. At Buffalo State, faculty librarians have compared their own salaries to other Masters-level faculty on campus, and furthermore they examined job descriptions and other unions’ salary pay grades of NYS civil service librarians in comparable roles. All findings were presented to various campus administrators to foster awareness and dialogue, and these endeavors and results will be shared here. Join the presenters to learn about the methodology behind the comparisons, what the data indicate, possible remediation, and how your own library can advocate for equitable salaries.
  • Enhancing the User Experience: A Look into the Overhaul of E. H. Butler Library’s Website
    • Katherine Bertel and Chris Parana, both of Buffalo State
    • The web has become much more dynamic and interactive in recent times. We see an opportunity for libraries to adhere to the same design principles used by popular websites, to create a more intuitive, dynamic, and enjoyable user experience. In our presentation, we will discuss the results from usability testing after a website redesign in 2012 (library.buffalostate.edu), our guiding design principles, and solutions to enhancing user experience, such as responsive web design, unified searching, and transitional interfaces. The goal is to create an engaging experience that draws users in, encourages usage, and inspires discovery.
  • Foreign Gods, Inc.
    • Okey Ndibe, author
    • Okey Ndibe, author of the recent Foreign Gods, Inc., will talk about his experiences as a novelist, political columnist, and essayist. Janet Maslin of The New York Times wrote of Foreign Gods, “Razor-sharp… Mr. Ndibe invests his story with enough dark comedy to make Ngene an odoriferous presence in his own right, and certainly not the kind of polite exotic rarity that art collectors are used to… In Mr. Ndibe’s agile hands, he’s both a source of satire and an embodiment of pure terror.”