Sessions – Thursday, June 12

Thursday, June 12th

8:30 a.m. – 9:15 a.m. – Session 1

  • Pushing Out the Boundaries and Establishing New Frontiers: An Active Information Literacy Program at Work
    • Charles Keyes, Hong Cheng, Galina Letnikova, and Alexandra Rojas, all of LaGuardia Community College
    • Quite often an academic library’s role within the curriculum is proscribed by an institution’s limited understanding of what a library can really contribute. At LaGuardia Community College, library faculty have successfully worked to build the Library’s reputation as a department that is key in helping to develop and teach research and critical inquiry skills. The presenters will outline how they established a strong, key presence in the new first year experience program, the teaching of credit courses, the Honors Program, and co-curricular activities. Advice and suggestions on pushing out a library’s boundaries and establishing new frontiers will be given.
  • Information Literacy Portal: Status and Next Steps
    • Logan Rath, The College at Brockport
    • At the OpenSUNY summit on December 5th librarians overwhelmingly decided that development of guidelines for and portal to share information literacy practices and content was a priority. This presentation will cover where we are and what our next steps will be. Want to be involved? This collaborative discussion is definitely for you!
  • From Silos to the Semantic Web: as Library Catalogs Open, What Do Students Hope to Find?
    • Madeline Veitch and Megan Coder, both representing SUNY New Paltz
    • With the arrival of discovery services and RDA cataloging rules, there is growing interest in making library catalog data more accessible to searchers on the open web. In a linked data or semantic web environment, bibliographic record content would coexist or integrate with commercial content. In a study of user preferences among undergraduate students at SUNY New Paltz, we asked students to reflect on which elements of a book or film record they value the most highly, and to rank existing commercial databases such as Amazon, IMDb, and LibraryThing against corresponding records in the SUNY New Paltz Ebsco Discovery Service. Trust and perceptions of credibility may play an important role in how students regard library catalog and commercial data, another topic explored in this research study.
  • Trash or Treasure? Gifts-in-Kind Practices Among New York State Libraries
    • Joseph A. Williams, SUNY Maritime College
    • Gifts-in-kind are often the bane of acquisition and collection development librarians. Unloved and unsolicited, they nevertheless form an important part of our print collections. The presenter, unduly fascinated by gifts-in-kind, conducted a survey of all public and academic New York State libraries to measure and analyze gifts-in-kind practices. The results are enlightening, not only as to the perceived role of gifts-in-kind by librarians, but also how the results underscore the fundamental differences between academic libraries and their public brethren.
  • Citations: There’s an App for That!
    • Mary Van Ullen and Jane Kessler, both of University at Albany
    • A common problem students struggle with is using correct citation format to create accurate bibliographies for their assignments. Bibliographic citation management software and web-based citation generators have existed for years. In addition, many popular academic databases also have online citation help features. With the increasing popularity of mobile devices, developers have created a variety of citation apps. These apps enable a patron to interact directly with library materials to create citations using their smartphones and tablets. In this presentation, we will share the results of our research on the ease of use and accuracy of some of the apps for both Android and IOS devices.
  • Website Usability without Bogging Down
    • Emily Mitchell, SUNY Oswego
    • Wouldn’t it be great if libraries could collaborate with our users to make our websites better? But getting user input takes exorbitant amounts of time, effort, money, or mad skills–doesn’t it? Come hear how one librarian is working with library stakeholders plus users and their data to find quick, high-quality solutions to her library website’s problems. We’ll touch on website analytics, task analysis, first-click testing, and what to do about that important page that no one is using.
  • Improving ILL Efficiencies with IDS Logic
    • Shannon Pritting, IDS Project and Syracuse University Libraries
    • During the past year, the IDS Technology Development Team has created an automation and efficiency service, IDS Logic, for Interlibrary Loan that connects to ILLiad through a dynamic server addon. Although there is a great deal of automation already in ILLiad and Interlibrary loan, IDS Logic can help automate the complex parts of ILL that now require staff mediation. Using connections to a library’s tools (such as its z39.50 server) as well as connecting to external APIs and web services, IDS Logic can find and import information that is needed to enhance ILL efficiency. This presentation will feature what automation tools, such as Lending Availability Service, are ready for release, and future development plans will also be discussed.

 

10:15 a.m. – 11:00 a.m. – Session 2

  • Information Literacy Instruction and Assessment: A Collaborative Design
    • Carlos Arguelles, Kingsborough Community College, City University of New York
    • Immerse students in a multi-session library instruction to develop information literacy skills. A planned instruction with the collaboration of the course instructor to support a step by step course project. To make informed adjustments to the course plan and the activities of the library session a pre and post assessment was implemented. This approach is part of the course “Critical Issues in Community Health” at Kingsborough Community College of CUNY.
  • Teach Where They Live: Library and Residential Life Collaborations
    • Michelle Bishop, SUNY Oswego
    • New students arrive with varied experiences, perceptions, and expectations about academic work. Many have outdated or culturally different perceptions of libraries or are overconfident about their ability to perform academic research. Information literacy instruction for these students is uniquely challenging. In this session, a librarian from SUNY Oswego will detail how she partnered with Residence Life to develop outreach initiatives which address the information literacy needs of freshman, new international students, and new transfer students.
  • One Bib to Rule Them All – SUNY One Bib / Shared Catalog Project (10:15-12:00)
    • Marianne Hebert, Potsdam, Maggie Horn, OLIS, Kevin McCoy, Suffolk, Nancy Poehlmann, University at Albany, Maureen Zajkowski, OLIS, and Angela Rhodes
    • The Shared Catalog and Authorities Task Force has been working since Fall of 2012 to explore the feasibility of creating a merged SUNY Union Catalog. Since the Regional Meetings in Fall 2013, OLIS and Task Force Sub-groups have continued to work on several aspects of the migration with Fall 2014 being the target for the implementation of a test environment. The session will focus on progress of the One Bib Project and anticipated Fall 2014 activities such as designing and evaluating the test environment, creating campus data profiles and identifying training needs and processes. This is also an opportunity for campuses to ask questions and share concerns.
  • An Indispensable Role: the Department of AAAS and the University Libraries’ Win-win situation in 2013 NYCAS at Binghamton
    • Julie Wang and Leslie Vega, both of Binghamton University
    • Asian Studies is steadily increasing in popularity at Binghamton University. Every few years, the Department of Asian and Asian American Studies (AAAS) has hosted the New York Conference on Asian Studies (NYCAS) at Binghamton. This year, the University Libraries has taken the opportunity to reach out and volunteer as one of the conference sponsors. Librarians and staff from several units of the library worked collaboratively with the AAAS Department to promote the Libraries’ newly established Asian collection and to advocate the importance of global studies. The Libraries played an important role during this year long preparation. In conjunction with the 2013 NYCAS, the Libraries displayed a vendor book exhibit, an exhibit of Asian garden books, and a showcase of Asian art works in Special Collections. This successful cross campus collaboration involved multiple departments, and resulted in a gathering of over 150 scholars and graduate students, from this region and from abroad. The presenters will recapture the whole operation from initiation, outreach, communication, coordination, preparation, process, and outcome. Through this case study, we would like to share a firsthand experience with other SUNY colleagues who might be interested in interdepartmental collaboration on campus in the future.
  • Stone Soup: Build the Fire, Combine Ingredients, Taste, and Adjust Cancelled
    • Sara Hull and Heather Shalhoub, both of SUNY Empire State College
    • Sara and Heather will share their experiences collaborating with the Center for Mentoring and Learning, faculty instructional technologists, and curriculum instructional designers in support of faculty scholarship being conducted through the Institute for Mentoring, Teaching & Learning (IMTL) at Empire State College. The IMTL is in its second year, and consists of a 2-day summer residency to get projects off the ground, with year-long follow-up in support of those projects.
  • Testing and Tweaking Your Way to a Better Library Website: Improved User Experience without a Massive Site Overhaul
    • Rebecca Hyams, SUNY Maritime College
    • We typically design our library websites with the best of intentions, wanting our patrons to have easy access to all of our services. Frequently though, we encounter a disconnect between how we view our pages and how our patrons actually use them. With the implementation and launch for EDS approaching, the faculty of the SUNY Maritime Library decided it was an ideal time to collaborate with our users to make simple tweaks to improve our site’s usability. This presentation will explore how the SUNY Maritime Library performed a multi-dimensional study, our findings, and our resulting improvements.
  • Simplifying Borrowing Privileges to Improve Access and Accuracy
    • Nancy Abashian and Jill Dixon, both of Binghamton University
    • The Binghamton University Libraries’ Borrowing Privileges Committee, comprised of key Public Services staff, simplified the process of managing patron borrowing accounts. By reducing borrowing statuses from 11 to 5 and standardizing loan periods, the committee reduced confusion and errors in processing while streamlining policies, enhanced services for some categories, and created access to services previously denied to specific groups.
    • This presentation will illustrate the process used in consolidating borrower categories, the impact on patrons and staff, and the opportunity created for examining additional policies and proposing new workflows in lending and circulation.

 

11:15 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. – Session 3

  • The Cognitive Apprenticeship Model for Library Instruction
    • Elizabeth Tompkins, Kingsborough Community College
    • The cognitive apprentice model (CA), which links apprenticeship-learning techniques with classroom practices, offers a flexible framework for planning and implementing library sessions. Developed by Collins, Brown, and Newman (1989), CA illuminates the thought process of teachers and other experts while they deliver instruction in problem solving, close reading, critical thinking, or other higher order reasoning. My application of CA utilizes the model to break down the thought process associated with library research into components that are comprehensible to all levels of students.
  • Disciplinary Discussions: Articulating and Integrating Information Literacy Outcomes
    • Julia Furay, Kingsborough Community College, Jonathan Cope, College of Staten Island, Jesus Sanabria, Bronx Community College, and Amy Stempler, College of Staten Island
    • What does an information literate student look like by the time they graduate? The answer, of course, depends on discipline. This project is an attempt to help librarians work with teaching faculty in their own institutions to articulate discipline-specific learning outcomes for students at 120 credits. These presenters, all CUNY librarians, will discuss the theoretical backing to this concept, as well as its implementation through a series of focus group conversations with departmental faculty.
  • One Bib to Rule Them All – SUNY One Bib / Shared Catalog Project (continued)
    • Marianne Hebert, Potsdam, Maggie Horn, OLIS, Kevin McCoy, Suffolk, Nancy Poehlmann, University at Albany, and Maureen Zajkowski, OLIS
    • The Shared Catalog and Authorities Task Force has been working since Fall of 2012 to explore the feasibility of creating a merged SUNY Union Catalog. Since the Regional Meetings in Fall 2013, OLIS and Task Force Sub-groups have continued to work on several aspects of the migration with Fall 2014 being the target for the implementation of a test environment. The session will focus on progress of the One Bib Project and anticipated Fall 2014 activities such as designing and evaluating the test environment, creating campus data profiles and identifying training needs and processes. This is also an opportunity for campuses to ask questions and share concerns.
  • Capturing Historic Voices: Forging Partnerships in the Digital Age
    • Mike Magilligan, SUNY Canton
    • In this conference presentation SUNY Canton’s Digital Technologies and Learning Librarian Mike Magilligan will discuss his experience in establishing Canton’s Veterans Oral History Project. This digital archive has been the product of partnerships between the college and various community, civic, and nonprofit organizations. In this presentation Mike will discuss the planning, networking, and public relations strategies that led to the successful launch of this project. This archive has also been innovative in its value as a tool for cross collaborations with Canton’s humanities division and the presentation will address the pedagogical applications that this archive allows for.
  • Reference Resources in SUNY Libraries: Future Empire Collaborations?
    • Jane Kessler and Carol Anderson, both of University at Albany
    • As the use of print reference collections decreases, and reference collection budgets are allocated to online resources supporting reference services, we collectively need to look ahead to what the reference collection of the 21st century should look like and how SUNY libraries could enhance collaboration and sharing of online reference resources. As a starting point, the presentation will provide an overview of UAlbany’s University Library’s reference collection weeding and fund reallocation project, transitioning from print resources to enhanced access to online reference resources.
  • Discover and Learn Together: a Review of the EDS Implementation Process
    • Abby Smith, SUNY Potsdam and Kristy Lee, SUNY New Paltz
    • The presentation will walk participants through the process of setting up the EBSCO discovery service, including both technical and logistical considerations. We will review areas that are unexpectedly challenging, which elements took more time than anticipated, and the decisions involved in the early stages of implementation.
  • Promoting the Value of Special Collections: A Subject Librarians’ Approach
    • Anne Larrivee and Leslie Vega, both of Binghamton University Libraries
    • Special Collections is the hidden heart of every library. These unique collections endure against the ever-changing scope and mission of academic libraries, where fiscal pressures threaten collections toward homogeneity. Unfortunately, Special Collections – the rare books, manuscripts, and archives of a university – often go unnoticed by the general student body. During this presentation, two subject librarians will discuss a variety of approaches they have used to promote Special Collections to both students and faculty. These approaches include promotion via instruction classes, the reference desk, social media channels and library exhibitions, as well as partnering with Special Collections on projects.
  • Enhancing the Curriculum Through The New York Times Academic Site License
    • Kevin J. Cappallo, The New York Times
    • Learn how both faculty and students can benefit from campus wide digital access to The New York Times through The New York Times Academic Site License Program. Explore our customized education websites, NYTimes in Education, NYTimes in Leadership and NYTimes in First Year. The New York Times brings the world to you; let it be your textbook and see how much is applicable across the entire curriculum.

 

1:45 p.m. – 2:30 p.m. – Session 4

  • Incorporating Information Literacy in the Majors: New Roles for Librarians
    • Trudi Jacobson, Jesus Alonso-Regalado, Patricia Pinho, and Paul Toscano, all of University at Albany
    • The University at Albany has a new requirement that academic departments must ensure that students in their majors meet upper level competencies (information literacy, advanced writing, oral discourse, and critical thinking). Moving responsibility to departments for this type of learning is happening at an increasing number of institutions. This can be a difficult transition, but provides the opportunity for conversation and collaboration. Learn how librarians at UAlbany were involved in the process, and what steps they took, at both the institutional and departmental levels, to facilitate a quality outcome. Hear, too, from a faculty member about how her department addressed this addition to the major.
  • ACRL’s Assessment in Action: Assessing Library Instruction, Collaborating across Campus and What We’ve Learned So Far
    • Kenneth R. Wierzbowski and Jennifer Kegler, both of the College at Brockport
    • The Drake Memorial Library is 1 of 75 libraries across North America to participate in ACRL’s Assessment in Action program. The 14-month program entails the development and implementation of an action learning project examining the library’s impact on student success and contribution to assessment activities on campus. Brockport’s 4 person team includes members from outside of the library to foster cross-campus collaboration. In this presentation, librarians on the team will discuss impressions with the program so far, some of the pitfalls and triumphs faced developing the project, and experiences in working with faculty and staff across campus.
  • Tag, You’re It: Enhancing Access to Graphic Novels
    • Wendy West, University at Albany
    • This presentation examines social tagging as aid for access to graphic novel titles in the discovery layer catalogs. In this project, the catalogs of a group of Association of Research Libraries were reviewed to determine if they offered social tagging options and, if they were, whether their users were applying social tags to records identifying materials as graphic novels. The presentation also discusses such issues as specific patterns in the tagging terminology and metadata used by catalogers to identify graphic novels.
  • Reading Habits Across Disciplines: A Study of Student eBook Use
    • Lee A. Cummings, Anne Larrivee, and Leslie Vega, all of Binghamton University
    • The advantages to choosing a title in electronic over print format have been widely publicized: saved shelf space, no lost or damaged materials, and concurrent access between unique users. But do these users have a preference? And if so, why? To begin to answer these questions, subject librarians from Binghamton University surveyed students in various fields of study. The resulting data offers some insights into what’s most important to students when using print or electronic books, and gives librarians information that can be used to improve the effectiveness of their collections.
  • Uncovering Discovery: Collaboration between Systems and Reference at Sojourner Truth Library
    • Lauren Marcus, Valerie Mittenberg, and Kristy Lee, all of SUNY New Paltz
    • Web scale discovery systems have been around for several years and the list of commercial vendors continues to grow annually. These systems promise more efficient scholarly research and increased access to collections far beyond library walls or even the library catalog. Yet academic librarians do not equally embrace these new research models. While IT specialists welcome the streamlined maintenance of “one click” search bars, out-of-the-box systems rarely meet the needs of academic libraries and require extensive customization. In addition, relevancy rankings may prioritize access to electronic resources, while diminishing access to print holdings. For these reasons, many reference librarians are hesitant to adopt the consumer-centric search model promoted by these systems. In January 2014, the Sojourner Truth Library (STL) implemented the “soft launch” of its EBSCO Discovery Service. This presentation discusses the collaboration between Reference and Systems Librarians at STL on the evaluation, selection, and customization of the EDS product. Topics of concern include: control over relevancy rankings, advanced search functionality, enhanced access to local holdings, and integration into bibliographic instruction.
  • New Technologies, Collaboration, and Entrepreneurship in Libraries: Harnessing Their Power to Help Your Library
    • Stephanie Walker, Dr. Howard Spivak, and Alex Rudshteyn, all of Brooklyn College, City University of New York
    • Academic libraries are caught in budget squeezes and struggle to communicate value to senior administration. At Brooklyn College, we’ve taken an unusual approach. Our technology staff work directly with librarians to develop products that meet user needs. We’ve developed 8 products, including an award-winning content management system (4MyLibrary) and a user-friendly book scanner. Recently, we started selling 2 products: our book scanners (at half the price of commercial alternatives), and a hosting service, whereby we host and support 4MyLibrary for libraries with minimal technology staff. Both yielded major benefits. We hope to spur broader technology collaboration among libraries.
  • Constructing a “Shared Services” Interlibrary Loan Department: A Narrative
    • Glen Bogardus, SUNY Canton and SUNY Potsdam Shared Services
    • As part of the campuses’ “Shared Services” initiative, the SUNY Canton and SUNY Potsdam libraries jointly hired an Interlibrary Loan Specialist in 2012. The ILL Specialist was charged with uniting the two campuses’ ILL departments, using merged resources to ensure quality ILL service to each institution, while capitalizing on these new cooperative resources to rejuvenate and expand existing document delivery services.
    • This presentation is a narrative account of the ILL Specialist’s efforts to build the newly conceived shared ILL service. In particular, the Specialist will discuss challenges faced in managing the merged library department while tailoring services to the distinct needs of each SUNY college—each with its own unique patron population and identity.

 

2:30 p.m. – 3:30 p.m. – Poster Sessions

 

3:30 p.m. – 4:15 p.m. – Session 5

  • Discovering Digital Collections
    • Brenda Hazard, Hudson Valley Community College, Katie Jezik, Hudson Valley Community College, Maggie Horn, SUNY Office of Library and Information Services, and Susan D’Entremont, Capital District Library Council
    • Hudson Valley Community College has been contributing digitized archival materials to New York Heritage, a research portal for accessing documents about historical New York State, for several years. As HVCC planned for its EBSCO Discovery Service (EDS) implementation, they realized they could make their digital collection more visible to their campus community and beyond. Hear from your colleagues at HVCC, who collaborated with the SUNY Office of Library and Information Services (SUNY OLIS) and the Capital District Library Council (CDLC), to learn about the steps they took to explore incorporating their NYHeritage Digital Collection into EDS, the lessons learned along the way, and how others can benefit from their experience to increase visibility and use of their digital collections.
  • Library Stress-Relievers Ease Student Anxieties during Finals Week
    • Dr. Ray L. Morrison, SUNY Oswego
    • Finals Week can be extremely stressful time for many college and university students.  However, students at Penfield Library (SUNY Oswego) are treated to a variety of services to help them de-stress during this harried time period. Some of these activities include free coffee and donuts, ear plugs, puzzles, massages, dog therapy, additional hours of assistance at the reference desk and hours the library is open.  This session will discuss ways other colleges and universities provide stress-free services.  Finally, there will be a time for participants to share stress-relieving techniques used in their libraries.
  • Assessment Strategies for Technical Services
    • Rebecca Mugridge and Nancy Poehlmann, both of University at Albany
    • The assessment of technical services activities is often limited to gathering and reporting statistics. This presentation goes beyond statistics and addresses a variety of qualitative assessment activities that can be useful in any technical services operation, large or small. When conducted regularly and methodically, qualitative assessment practices can help managers and administrators understand the impact and value of the work that we do for our customers, and improve our effectiveness. This presentation will address a variety of qualitative assessment techniques: workflow analysis, customer service surveys, focus groups, quality initiatives, benchmarking, and other methods.
  • EBSCO eBooks: The Latest Enhancements and Collections for Academic Libraries
    • Jim Kropelin and Amy Levine, both of EBSCO Information Services
    • Join EBSCO Information Services for an informative and exciting session covering the latest EBSCO eBook news and enhancements. Topics include: newly released subject sets for purchase, new subscription collections, and the latest EBSCO eBook enhancements. EBSCO has developed new subject-specific collections for subscription. Providing unlimited access at a very reasonable subscription cost, these new collections include: History, Nursing, Business, and Education. EBSCO has also upgraded our patron-driven acquisition (PDA) model, and the ability to suppress titles based on usage. We hope you are able to attend this session with us.
  • A “Commons within a Commons:” Data-Driven Service Planning for Graduate Students
    • Eugene J. Harvey, Assessment Librarian and Maureen A. Lindstrom, both of SUNY Buffalo State
    • Although only in the beginning stages, E. H. Butler Library ultimately envisions the creation of a Graduate Commons, modeled after its successful Information Commons established in 2006. As the planning process unfolds, this innovative “Commons-within-a-Commons” approach may feature personalized research services during a student’s thesis-writing stage, customized instruction, dedicated learning spaces, tailored technology support, and librarian-graduate faculty collaborations. The presentation will highlight LibQUAL+® findings, the methodology behind the planning process, current implementations, future directions, and ongoing assessment strategies. Attendee outcomes center on: 1) using data to guide decision making, 2) aligning services to specific user needs, 3) creatively deploying human resources to enact planning initiatives, and 4) closing the loop on assessment outcomes.
  • Long-Term Preservation of Digital Objects: Developing a Plan without Losing Your Mind
    • Kathryn Frederick, Skidmore College
    • This presentation will explain how Skidmore College developed a plan for the long-term preservation of digital files. I will give an overview of digital preservation, discuss what types of files and metadata we are preserving, the tools we are using to do it, and the process I used to develop the plan.
  • Evaluating Student Workforce Performance
    • Andrew Lyons, University at Albany
    • Managing a student workforce to best provide technical and other support in an Information Commons environment can be a challenge. Supervisors need to evaluate student employee performance, make decisions about coverage for support locations, and mentor their workers. The challenge is in collecting useful and balanced performance metrics and other information, then providing the results in an appropriate, timely, and productive manner so that student employees can be successful immediately and perform to their potential in the longer term. We will discuss the methods and tools used by UAlbany ITS-Client Support Services to collect and evaluate metrics as well as how we provide feedback to our student employees so that we can best help all users of our resources.