Sessions – Wednesday, June 11

Wednesday, June 11th

SUNYLA Continuing Education Workshops

8:30 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. (with a 10:00-10:30 a.m. break) Session 1/2

  • Student Group Work: Collaboration or Catastrophe?
    • Michelle Toth, SUNY Plattsburgh
    • This session will cover: The purpose and benefits of group work (or, the answer to – ‘why are you making us do this?’); The pros and cons of group work for instructors, students and the learning process; Types and formats of groups (for credit courses, one-shots or online); The methods and madness in assigning groups; How to facilitate a good group experience (we are more to blame than you think); Using technology to facilitate groups; and assessing the product, process and participants.

8:30 a.m. – 10:00 a.m. – Session 1

  • Geeks Bearing Gifts: Unwrapping New Technology Trends
    • Missy Harvey, National Network of Libraries of Medicine, Middle Atlantic Region
    • This session is intended to provide a fun, fast-paced, and informative introduction to and update on, today’s hottest technology trends. Program participants will be able to identify technology trends and they will understand how these trends will impact or can be integrated into traditional library services: http://nnlm.gov/training/geekgifts/.
  • The “Secret Life” of Online Students: See What Goes on in an Online Information Literacy Class and See – via Blackboard Surveys – What Students Have to Say About Taking Online Library Courses
    • Jane Verostek, SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry
    • Are you wondering what online information literacy courses look like and what students really think of taking online library courses? In this session you will learn how to teach information literacy completely online using Blackboard. SUNY ESF has been using Blackboard since 2009 to teach a 5 week 1 credit information literacy course. Our online course is taught to students during the regular semesters/on campus and during the summer to remote/distance students. This presentation will show real world examples from the class and will give steps on how to set up and organize the course within Blackboard. Ideas on how to get the students excited and involved in class blogs will also be given. Helpful online links and tips for different research tools will be also given with regards to teaching about library catalogs, serial literature databases, the Internet, and creating bibliographies. Time will be spent in a live online information literacy class. We will also look at survey responses from students who went through online information literacy classes.
  • Creating e-Citizens: the New York State Digital Literacy Curriculum (Part 1)
    • MaryAnne Waltz, New York Library Association
    • An introduction to the approved curriculum for statewide use in Digital Literacy training for adults. A complete product, it comprises four modules: introduction to computers; introduction to the Internet; communicating on the Internet; and word processing. Each module includes a lesson plan with goals (outcomes), supplementary instructional resources, and assessment tools. We will discuss the program, its goals and implementation, the curriculum, and its ramifications for libraries.
  • WGIL Special Interest Group
    • Carleen Huxley, SUNY Jefferson
    • Participants will learn:
    1. What the SUNYLA WGIL General Education task force has done.
    2. The current status of initiatives by the task force.
    3. What they can do to help bring this dialogue back to their home campus.
  • Librarian Equity: An Open Forum Q&A on UUP Contract Appendix 48
    • Jason Torre, Stony Brook University Libraries & UUP Appendix 48 Advisory Committee on Librarian [Equity] Issues
    • Librarian Equity: An Open Forum Q&A on UUP Contract Appendix 48 is an open forum, question and answer session designed to provide SUNYLA members represented by United University Professions with information on the 2011-2016 NYS/UUP Contract Appendix 48: Executive Level Review of Librarian Issues and to provide input for the post-contract negotiations on Librarian equity issues.

 

10:30 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. – Session 2

  • Search Engine Optimization
    • Roger Lipera, University at Albany
    • This class covers the basics of optimizing a Web site to improve its placement in search engine results. Learn the principles behind proper Meta tags, text, alt tags, and much more. Participants will also discover how to drive visitors to Web sites using good promotional practices. Included will be information about Facebook and Open Graph attributes. You do not need to have a Web site or know HTML to participate. This class is intended for those who want to become familiar with the concepts and techniques of SEO and site promotion.
  • Altmetrics in Practice
    • Mike Buschman, Plum Analytics
    • There is almost no limit to the ways research is being discovered and disseminated. For example, today we have things like Twitter and Mendeley. In the future there will be more new ways of interacting with research. Yet, even though this area has moved quickly, we are still often using techniques developed fifty years ago to evaluate research. Journal Impact Factor and citation counts are the tried and true measure for research impact. They are still important, but now we need modern ways of capturing activity around research. One field that has been born into this area is altmetrics. During this panel, the speakers will define altmetrics and talk about what is good and bad about them, discuss social media and what it can and cannot tell you about research, and how using new metrics helps support the research community. The panel will consist of both a provider of one of the altmetric systems and a librarian user of such a system.
  • Creating e-Citizens: the New York State Digital Literacy Curriculum (Part 2)
    • Mary Anne Waltz, New York Library Association
    • An introduction to the approved curriculum for statewide use in Digital Literacy training for adults. A complete product, it comprises four modules: introduction to computers; introduction to the Internet; communicating on the Internet; and word processing. Each module includes a lesson plan with goals (outcomes), supplementary instructional resources, and assessment tools. We will discuss the program, its goals and implementation, the curriculum, and its ramifications for libraries.
  • Artemis Literary Sources: Promotion, Discovery, and Connecting the Dots Across the Curriculum
    • Nan Frost and Stacey Knibloe, Gale Cengage
    • A composition or literature writing assignment doesn’t mean you have to keep your discussion limited to genre, voice, or mood.  Literature is not written in a disciplinary vacuum.  This round table discussion looks at using seemingly “literature specific” resources to connect the dots to multidisciplinary research and writing. Participants will discuss best practices to promote Artemis Literary Sources to students and faculty across the curriculum.   Inspiration begins with the hunt!
  • The Next Generation Web of Science & Journal Citation Report
    • Stephen DiGiulio, Thomson Reuters Expert in the U.S. Academic Markets
    • Come learn about the next generation Web of Science; a new, user-friendly interface, expanded content and convenient open-web links. The next generation Web of Science makes Web of Science content and records easily accessible to users via links from open-web platforms, such as Google Scholar. Open Access (OA) and Funding Acknowledgement functionality, as well as the new Journal Citation Reports & Essential Science Indicators on the InCites platform will also be discussed.

 

1:00 p.m. – 2:30 p.m. – Session 3

  • Customizing EBSCO’s A to Z and LinkSource Products
    • Patrick Patterson, SUNY Potsdam
    • In this workshop you will learn how to customize EBSCO’s A to Z and LinkSource products to best fit the needs of your library. A to Z is used to manage all of your library’s electronic resources including subscriptions to individual electronic journals and full-text databases. LinkSource is the link resolver component that allows for full text linking to occur from one database to another. This will be a chance to learn about the different ways that you can present information to your patrons, such as branding and creating section titles to communicate the type of content that is available to them. The workshop is for administrators who are responsible for managing these two products.
  • Sustainable Thinking
    • Rebekkah Smith Aldrich, Mid-Hudson Library System, and Mary Ellen Mallia, PhD
    • Join the “sustainable thinking” movement! The infusion of the core value of sustainability into our organizations – in every area of operations, not just facilities – will help lead to choices, partnerships and messages that will positively impact the future of our libraries. There are advantages to be gained on many fronts by adopting and developing a sustainable thought pattern, including funding, public perception, and library worker satisfaction.
  • Understanding Altmetrics
    • William Gunn, Mendeley
    • This workshop will provide an introduction to the concept of altmetrics and how they’re being used by libraries, researchers, and publishers. The major sources of altmetrics will be compared and the coverage, time scales, and field differences will be discussed. Attendees will learn how talk to authors about altmetrics and assist patrons in understanding the broader impacts of their research by building their altmetrics profile and registering for an ORCID. In addition, examples of the use of altmetrics for discovery and collection development will be demonstrated. We would like this workshop to be interactive, so there will be plenty of opportunities for hands-on activities and questions. The primary presenter will seek to partner with a librarian attendee to develop the workshop and ensure relevance to attendees.
  • Getting Started with WordPress for the Classroom and Personal Use
    • Roger Lipera, University at Albany
    • WordPress is a very popular Web content management and page design system. This class is an overview of how WordPress works. Discussion includes how to start a WordPress account, setup a site, and the differences between WordPress.com and WordPress.org.
  • Collaborating to Write Scholarly Communications: Find Inspiration from one Librarian’s Journey
    • Jennifer Kegler, the College at Brockport
    • During this session perspective authors will learn how one librarian wrote and published articles, as a sole author, co-author and with a group of authors. Creative opportunities and projects abound on a college campus; the harder part is converting these projects into publishable material. Bring your own ideas and/or drafts, and we will work on them together. We will also identify publishing opportunities: both “traditional” journals and open access titles.
  • A whirlwind tour of RDA, or, Toto, I don’t think we’re in AACR2 anymore!
    • John Myers, Union College
    • An overview of the key conceptual and structural differences between AACR2 and RDA, accompanied by examples of specific differences between the results achieved by the two cataloging codes.