Wed. Session 1

Wednesday, June 11th

SUNYLA Continuing Education Workshops

8:30 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. (with a 10:00-10:30 a.m. break) Session 1/2

  • Student Group Work: Collaboration or Catastrophe?

    • Michelle Toth, SUNY Plattsburgh
    • This session will cover: The purpose and benefits of group work (or, the answer to – ‘why are you making us do this?’); The pros and cons of group work for instructors, students and the learning process; Types and formats of groups (for credit courses, one-shots or online); The methods and madness in assigning groups; How to facilitate a good group experience (we are more to blame than you think); Using technology to facilitate groups; and assessing the product, process and participants.

8:30 a.m. – 10:00 a.m. – Session 1

  • Geeks Bearing Gifts: Unwrapping New Technology Trends
    • Missy Harvey, National Network of Libraries of Medicine, Middle Atlantic Region
    • This session is intended to provide a fun, fast-paced, and informative introduction to and update on, today’s hottest technology trends. Program participants will be able to identify technology trends and they will understand how these trends will impact or can be integrated into traditional library services: http://nnlm.gov/training/geekgifts/.
  • The “Secret Life” of Online Students: See What Goes on in an Online Information Literacy Class and See – via Blackboard Surveys – What Students Have to Say About Taking Online Library Courses
    • Jane Verostek, SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry
    • Are you wondering what online information literacy courses look like and what students really think of taking online library courses? In this session you will learn how to teach information literacy completely online using Blackboard. SUNY ESF has been using Blackboard since 2009 to teach a 5 week 1 credit information literacy course. Our online course is taught to students during the regular semesters/on campus and during the summer to remote/distance students. This presentation will show real world examples from the class and will give steps on how to set up and organize the course within Blackboard. Ideas on how to get the students excited and involved in class blogs will also be given. Helpful online links and tips for different research tools will be also given with regards to teaching about library catalogs, serial literature databases, the Internet, and creating bibliographies. Time will be spent in a live online information literacy class. We will also look at survey responses from students who went through online information literacy classes.
  • Creating e-Citizens: the New York State Digital Literacy Curriculum (Part 1)
    • MaryAnne Waltz, New York Library Association
    • An introduction to the approved curriculum for statewide use in Digital Literacy training for adults. A complete product, it comprises four modules: introduction to computers; introduction to the Internet; communicating on the Internet; and word processing. Each module includes a lesson plan with goals (outcomes), supplementary instructional resources, and assessment tools. We will discuss the program, its goals and implementation, the curriculum, and its ramifications for libraries.
  • WGIL Special Interest Group
    • Carleen Huxley, SUNY Jefferson
    • Participants will learn:
    1. What the SUNYLA WGIL General Education task force has done.
    2. The current status of initiatives by the task force.
    3. What they can do to help bring this dialogue back to their home campus.
  • Librarian Equity: An Open Forum Q&A on UUP Contract Appendix 48
    • Jason Torre, Stony Brook University Libraries & UUP Appendix 48 Advisory Committee on Librarian [Equity] Issues
    • Librarian Equity: An Open Forum Q&A on UUP Contract Appendix 48 is an open forum, question and answer session designed to provide SUNYLA members represented by United University Professions with information on the 2011-2016 NYS/UUP Contract Appendix 48: Executive Level Review of Librarian Issues and to provide input for the post-contract negotiations on Librarian equity issues.